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Post Reports

Post Reports

Post Reports is the daily podcast from The Washington Post. Unparalleled reporting. Expert insight. Clear analysis. Everything you?ve come to expect from the newsroom of The Post. For your ears. Martine Powers is your host, asking the questions you didn?t know you wanted answered. Published weekdays by 5 p.m. Eastern time.

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A turning point for voting rights

The future of voting rights ? in state legislatures across the country and before the Supreme Court.
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In recent weeks, Republican state legislators across the country have been proposing and voting on a variety of voting restrictions. Politics reporter Amy Gardner examines the onslaught of legislation intended to limit mail-in ballots, early-voting periods and ballot boxes ? and the motivations behind the proposals. 
On Tuesday, a key part of the Voting Rights Act was stress-tested before the Supreme Court. Gilda Daniels, a former deputy chief in the Justice Department and the author of ?Uncounted: The Crisis of Voting Suppression in America,? breaks down the arguments before the court. 
2021-03-05
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The legacy of a conspiracy theory

How the conspiracy theories that fueled ?Pizzagate? were a harbinger of QAnon. Texas in the aftermath of the devastating winter storms. And, a remembrance of Vernon Jordan.
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The ?Pizzagate? gunman has been released from prison. After Edgar Maddison Welch entered a popular D.C. pizzeria and fired shots in December 2016, he told law enforcement that he had gone there to investigate a conspiracy theory. Reporter Mike Miller explains how Pizzagate signaled the deepening of violence linked to conspiracy theories that would later lead to the siege of the Capitol on Jan. 6. 
The power is back on, but millions of Texans wonder what it will take to fully recover ? and who will help them. National correspondent Arelis Hernández reports on the Lone Star State two weeks after the deadly winter storms led to a near-collapse of the state?s power grid. 
Robin Givhan on the legacy and life of Vernon Jordan, and how he made being a Black man in America look effortless.
2021-03-04
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Don?t mask with Texas

Texas lifts its coronavirus measures requiring masks and allows businesses to reopen. President Biden?s first failed Cabinet nomination. And the building that reminds people of ? the poop emoji.
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Politics reporter Philip Bump breaks down Texas Gov. Gregg Abbott?s decision to reopen the state?s businesses and lift its mask mandate ? and why it?s not an opportune time to do it. 
White House reporter Seung Min Kim explains why Neera Tanden, President Biden?s controversial pick to lead the Office of Management and Budget, withdrew her nomination after facing opposition from both Democrats and Republicans
The strangely shaped Helix is a distraction, art and architecture critic Phillip Kennicott writes. There?s a lot more to Amazon?s new D.C.-area headquarters than meets the eye.
2021-03-03
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Gen Z leads LGBT shift

Generation Z is breaking with binary notions of gender and sexuality. And, how the first season of ?The Bachelor? to feature a Black man has only highlighted the show?s racism problem.    
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Recent surveys show that a growing percentage of the U.S. population identifies as LGBT. What?s less clear is why. Is it because of a real shift in sexual orientation and gender identity? Or is it because of a greater willingness among young people to identify as LGBT? Samantha Schmidt reports. 
The ?Bachelor? franchise is facing a public reckoning after revelations about a contestant?s racist past. Style reporter Emily Yahr and Vulture writer Ali Barthwell explain what happened, and what this episode can tell us about Bachelor Nation and reality television as a whole.
The pandemic has been dragging on for almost a year now, and we want to hear from listeners about how you?re coping. Record a voice memo telling us who you are, where you live and what you?ve been doing in the past year to find joy. Send it to [email protected].
2021-03-02
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Biden?s Middle East woes

The U.S. intelligence report on the murder of Jamal Khashoggi is finally released. And, how Donald Trump took a wrecking ball to U.S. relations in the Mideast, and whether President Biden will be able to recalibrate foreign policy in the region.
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The Saudi crown prince, Mohammed bin Salman, approved the operation that led to the death of Washington Post columnist, Jamal Khashoggi. National security reporter Karen DeYoung explains what we know from the long-awaited intelligence report. 
Foreign affairs columnist Ishaan Tharoor discusses the Mideast problems piling up for Biden, and whether the new administration will be able to accomplish its ambitious agenda in the region. ?After four years of what's been perceived as kind of wrecking-ball diplomacy by Trump when it comes to the Middle East, it's a pretty thorny set of challenges that await President Biden, having to both think through what these challenges mean for his American interests, but also having to undo some of the work that Trump did,? Tharoor says.
The pandemic has been dragging on for almost a year now, and we want to hear from listeners about how you?re coping. Record a voice memo telling us who you are, where you live and what you?ve been doing in the last year to find joy. Send it to [email protected].
2021-03-01
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The violence rattling Asian Americans

Asian American communities are bracing themselves against an increase of violent assaults, leaving the marginalized group feeling under attack and isolated. 
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Attacks against Asian Americans are surging. While data is scant, the numbers in New York City and San Francisco ? cities with large, long established Asian American communities ? are up. 
Racially motivated attacks are chronically underreported, reporter Marian Liu says. ?On top of that, there's a high threshold to proving what a hate crime is.? 
Liu spoke with Post Reports senior producer Reena Flores about the recent string of viral videos showing violence against elderly Asian Americans and how those attacks have left people in the minority group fearful. ?The community has been left feeling very isolated.? Liu says. ?They had to report this on their own, create their own database. And many have taken to patrolling their own streets ?like people are patrolling Chinatown on their own.? 
About US is an initiative by The Washington Post to cover issues of identity in the United States. Sign up for the newsletter.
2021-02-26
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A balancing act in Honduras

As President Biden seeks to reset immigration policy, uncertainty surrounds the U.S. relationship with Honduras and its president, Juan Orlando Hernández, who is implicated in drug trafficking. 
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For four years, Honduran President Juan Orlando Hernández built his governing program around the demands of the Trump administration, which in turn stayed out of Honduras?s domestic affairs. 
Now, that arrangement is ending, and Hernández is finding himself in a precarious position as the United States pivots from one administration to another. 
Mexico City bureau chief Kevin Sieff spent a week with Hernández and his team. He spoke with producer Alexis Diao about that surreal week, and how the biggest threat to Hernández could be an extradition treaty he pushed through himself.
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2021-02-25
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Will a minimum-wage hike save the economy?

Behind the fight over raising the minimum wage ? and why the Senate parliamentarian is at the center of it. Plus, boomers embrace online shopping. 
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President Biden?s push to increase the federal minimum wage is facing significant hurdles in Congress, opposed by skeptical Republicans, centrist Democrats and many business owners. Labor reporter Eli Rosenberg lays out the cases for and against the policy as a tool of financial relief during the pandemic.
Obscure Senate procedures are also complicating the issue. Post producer Arjun Singh and lawyer Jonathan Gould explain the role of the Senate parliamentarian in deciding whether Democrats can squeeze a federal minimum-wage hike into a $1.9 trillion coronavirus relief package using the budget reconciliation process. 
Older Americans are increasing buying groceries ? and just about everything else ? on the Internet. Abha Bhattarai unpacks boomers? growing tech savvy
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2021-02-24
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An apolitical Justice Department?

Merrick Garland?s plans for the Department of Justice. And, another push to provide pandemic loans to small businesses.
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President Biden has vowed to remake the Department of Justice, placing a greater emphasis on promoting racial justice, criminal justice reform, and investigating and rooting out domestic terrorism. His nominee for U.S. attorney general, Merrick Garland, testified before the Senate Judiciary Committee this week. Matt Zapotosky reports. 
Business reporter Aaron Gregg explains the change in coronavirus relief that could help more mom-and-pop businesses survive the pandemic.
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2021-02-23
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Pregnancy, coronavirus vaccines and a difficult choice

Pregnant people and their babies face severe risks if they get infected with the coronavirus. Newly available vaccines could be a source of hope. But without good data, many pregnant people are agonizing over whether the shots are right for them.
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As vaccines become more widely available, many pregnant people are being asked to decide whether they?re ready to trust and receive a shot. For some, that decision could be the difference between life and death. 
False claims tying vaccines to infertility are driving doubts among women of childbearing age. Health officials worry their hesitation may affect efforts to reach immunization targets.
If you value the journalism you hear in this podcast, please subscribe to The Washington Post. We have a deal for our listeners ? one year of unlimited access to everything The Post publishes for just $29. To sign up, go to postreports.com/offer
2021-02-22
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Why so many Texans still don't have water

Most Texans are finally getting their power back, but millions of people are still without water as the crisis escalates in the storm-ravaged state. And why coronavirus cases are finally dropping in the United States.
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Although most Texans have finally had their power restored, millions of people are now facing a water crisis because of cracked pipes and knocked out water-treatment plants. Arelis Hernández reports from San Antonio.
The rate of newly recorded coronavirus infections is plummeting from coast to coast and the worst surge yet is finally relenting. Writer Reis Thebault on why covid-19 cases are dropping.
2021-02-19
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The rise and fall of Philly?s mass vaccination clinic

Philadelphia?s first mass vaccination site looked like a model of 21st-century efficiency ? until the city abruptly shut it down after losing trust in the group that ran it. Plus, how the pandemic has led some men to realize they need deeper friendships. 
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A mass vaccination clinic in Philadelphia opened with fanfare but closed amid rifts of trust. Frances Stead Sellers explains the swift rise and fall of Philly Fighting Covid. 
No game days. No bars. Samantha Schmidt reports on how the pandemic is making some men realize they need deeper friendships. 
2021-02-18
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The lone grid state

Understanding the freezing weather sweeping across the United States ? and why Texas?s independent power grid was doomed to fail in its wake. Plus, NASA tries to land a car on Mars.
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At least 14 people are dead in four states after a record-breaking cold snap swept through parts of the United States. Meteorologist Matthew Cappucci explains the science behind the freezing temperatures ? and why the country might be bracing for more.
Will Englund reports on how the Texas power grid got crushed because its operators weren?t prepared
NASA?s Mars rover, Perseverance, could be in for a bumpy landing Thursday. But if it survives the ?seven minutes of terror,? Perseverance could hold the key to future exploration of the Red Planet. 
2021-02-17
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How many extremists are in the military?

Why it won?t be easy to root out far-right extremism in the military. Why Indian farmers are protesting. And who pours the kibble for the first dogs? 
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In the wake of the Jan. 6 insurrection, the Pentagon is struggling to answer a basic question: How many extremists work among its ranks? Missy Ryan reports. 
In Delhi, tens of thousands of Indian farmers have formed a protest encampment several miles long. Joanna Slater traces the origins of the revolt
Graphics reporter Bonnie Berkowitz on who takes care of White House dogs. 
If you value the journalism you hear in this podcast, please subscribe to The Washington Post. We have a deal for our listeners ? one year of unlimited access to everything The Post publishes for just $29. To sign up, go to postreports.com/offer.
2021-02-16
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?Presidential?: Andrew Johnson

In honor of Presidents? Day, the story of a president who was impeached during a time of great division: Andrew Johnson. This story is from The Post?s podcast ?Presidential? with Lillian Cunningham.
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The Post?s podcast ?Presidential? is a historical journey through the personality and legacy of each of the American presidents. Listen to the whole archive here
If you?re hearing this episode on Presidents? Day, check out the ?Presidential? trivia event! It's free, virtual and will take place on Monday, Feb. 15 at 8 p.m. Eastern time. Here?s the link to register: https://washpost.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_RQlQCtT1TyiACpm2HZl_uA
If you value the journalism you hear in this podcast, subscribe to The Washington Post. We have a deal for our listeners ? one year of unlimited access to everything The Post publishes for just $29. To sign up, go to postreports.com/offer
2021-02-15
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Liz Cheney?s ?vote of conscience?

There?s one big question hanging over the second impeachment trial of Donald Trump: How many Republicans will be willing to break with the former president and vote to convict? Today, a story about the potential cost of a vote of ?conscience? and what that can tell us about the future of the GOP.
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Rep. Liz Cheney?s vote to impeach Trump prompted a voter rebellion in the Republican?s home state? and the backlash shows that loyalty to the former president runs deep in the GOP. Post Reports senior producer Reena Flores went to Wyoming to report on the schism in the Republican party.
The Senate impeachment trial of Donald Trump is ongoing, and there?s still an open question about how many Republicans will decide to break with the former president and vote to convict him. You can follow The Post?s live coverage here.
If you value the journalism you hear in this podcast, please subscribe to The Washington Post! We have a deal just for podcast listeners ? two years of unlimited access to everything The Post publishes, for just $59 total. That comes out to around $2.46 per month. To sign up, go to washingtonpost.com/subscribe.
2021-02-12
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A split screen of two presidents

As the impeachment trial continues, the former and the current president are pursuing very different strategies: One is watching the trial closely, while the other is doing everything he can to demonstrate that he is not watching at all.
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Former president Donald Trump has been watching his second impeachment trial closely, while President Biden messages that he has better things to do. Ashley Parker, The Post?s White House bureau chief, and reporter Anne Gearan paint a sharp juxtaposition between the current and former presidents this week. 
Catch up on the latest from the impeachment trial by listening to The Daily 202?s Big Idea, The Post?s morning news briefing.
If you value the journalism you hear in this podcast, please subscribe to The Washington Post! We have a deal for our listeners: one year of unlimited access to everything The Post publishes for just $29. To sign up, go to postreports.com/offer.
2021-02-11
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The mob that Trump built?

House managers make the case that Donald Trump spent months laying the groundwork for January?s riot at the Capitol. Plus, how the states that are pulling ahead in vaccinations are getting it done.
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On Wednesday, arguments began in the second impeachment trial of Donald Trump. Politics reporter Aaron Blake unpacks House Democrats? strategies
This week, the United States passed an encouraging milestone: 10 percent of the population has received at least one dose of the coronavirus vaccine. And a somewhat surprising collection of states has been leading the pack. National correspondent Griff Witte explains what they?re getting right. Then, Post Reports producer Jordan-Marie Smith speaks with Anne Zink, the chief medical officer of Alaska, about why that state is leading the pack, despite a sprawling and challenging landscape.
As the impeachment trial continues this week, consider going back to listen to our deep-dive into the events at the Capitol on Jan. 6. That episode gives a moment-by-moment breakdown of the riot, with voices you may not have heard before, and insight into the events at the center of the impeachment trial. That episode of Post Reports is called ?Four Hours of Insurrection,? and you can find it here or wherever you get your podcasts.
For the latest impeachment news, check out The Washington Post?s live blog, or The Daily 202?s Big Idea, a morning news briefing from The Washington Post. 
If you value the journalism you hear every weekday on this podcast, consider subscribing to The Washington Post. You can find a special offer just for our listeners at postreports.com/offer
2021-02-11
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?The framers? worst nightmare come to life?

The impeachment trial begins with an argument about whether it is constitutional in the first place. And, how the Keystone XL pipeline became a political shorthand for climate policy. 
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On the first day of former president Donald Trump?s second impeachment trial, his attorneys are asking: Can a president even be impeached after he has left office? Reporter Ann E. Marimow explains the constitutional questions at play.
President Biden has said that addressing climate change is one of his foremost priorities as president. And since his first day in office, he has taken aim at controversial oil and gas policies, such as the previous administration?s support of the divisive Keystone XL pipeline. Senior national affairs reporter Juliet Eilperin on the future of pipelines in the United States
As the impeachment trial continues this week, consider going back to listen to our deep-dive into the events at the Capitol on Jan. 6. That episode gives a moment-by-moment breakdown of the riot, with voices you may not have heard before, and insight into the events at the center of the impeachment trial. That episode of Post Reports is called ?Four Hours of Insurrection,? and you can find it here or wherever you get your podcasts.
For the latest impeachment news, check out washingtonpost.com or The Daily 202?s Big Idea, a morning news briefing from The Washington Post. 
If you value the journalism you hear every weekday in this podcast, consider subscribing to The Post. You can find a special offer just for our listeners at postreports.com/offer.
2021-02-09
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Trump?s rhetoric on trial

On the cusp of another impeachment trial, court documents point to how former president Donald Trump?s rhetoric allegedly fueled the rioters who attacked the Capitol. And, whether double-masking makes sense.
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Reporter Rosalind S. Helderman shares the latest in the impending impeachment trial of former president Donald Trump.
Health reporter Fenit Nirappil explains whether people should start wearing surgical masks beneath their fabric masks ? especially as coronavirus variants spread.
As the impeachment trial begins this week, consider going back to listen to our Post Reports deep dive into the events at the Capitol on Jan. 6. That episode gives a moment-by-moment breakdown of the riot, with voices you may not have heard before and insights into the events at the center of the impeachment trial. That episode of Post Reports is called ?Four Hours of Insurrection,? and you can find it here or wherever you get your podcasts.
If you value the journalism you hear every weekday in this podcast, consider subscribing to The Post. You can find a special offer just for our listeners at postreports.com/offer.
2021-02-08
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Democrats prepare to go it alone on covid relief

What you need to know about the economic relief package, and how Democrats are pushing it through Congress without any Republican support. And America?s chicken wing crisis. 
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In an early morning vote Friday, the Senate passed a budget bill that paves the way for President Biden?s $1.9 trillion economic relief plan. Reporter Jeff Stein reports on why Democrats soured on bipartisan efforts and ultimately decided to move forward without GOP support. 
Meanwhile, America is facing another deficit: chicken wings. ?The pandemic has caused us to eat so much chicken,? explains business reporter Jacob Bogage. ?Now that it's time for the Super Bowl, we no longer have enough chicken wings.?
2021-02-05
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Putin?s latest gamble

The Kremlin cracks down on opposition leader Alexei Navalny?s supporters all over Russia. And, how Pfizer is making the most of its available vaccine doses. 
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President Vladimir Putin has continued efforts to quash massive protests in Russia, spurred by the arrest and sentencing of recently returned opposition leader Alexei Navalny. Robyn Dixon reports from Moscow.
Health business reporter Christopher Rowland explains how the Pfizer drug company is squeezing extra doses from overfilled vials of its coronavirus vaccine. 
If you value the journalism you hear in this podcast, please subscribe to The Washington Post! We have a deal just for podcast listeners ? two years of unlimited access to everything The Post publishes for just $59 total. That comes out to around $2.46 per month. To sign up, go to washingtonpost.com/subscribe.
2021-02-04
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The GOP?s Marjorie Taylor Greene problem

How Republicans helped prop up the controversial congresswoman from Georgia. Why nursing home workers keep turning down vaccines. And, a tale of two ski resorts. 
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Marjorie Taylor Greene didn?t get to Congress on her own. Michael Kranish explores how prominent Republicans promoted the follower of extremist QAnon ideology, helping to usher her to power and ultimately deepening rifts in the party.
Reporter Rachel Chason explains the skepticism amongst nursing home workers to get the coronavirus vaccine.
Across the Franco-Swiss border, reporter Rick Noack finds a tale of two very different ski resorts where covid rules clash, and regional policies are having a major impact on tourism.
What you need to know about the coronavirus variants.
2021-02-03
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What happens after Myanmar?s coup?

Monday?s military coup in Myanmar was a long time coming. But what happens next? And, Canada vaccinates its homeless population. 
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Reporters Shibani Mahtani and Anne Gearan contextualize the overthrow of Aung San Suu Kyi?s civilian government in Myanmar.
Foreign correspondent Amanda Coletta reports on Canada?s efforts to vaccinate people experiencing homelessness.
Join the ?Presidential? virtual trivia night, hosted by Lillian Cunningham. It takes place at 8 p.m. Eastern on Monday, Feb. 15. Register here: https://bit.ly/2YwuEWy
2021-02-02
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The ex-president?s defense

Former president Donald Trump plans his impeachment defense. Why a new vaccine could be a game-changer. And, the owl pellet economy.
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Trump?s legal team unravels as the former president sticks to his script on his false claims of having won the 2020 presidential election. Reporter Josh Dawsey reports on what this means for the impeachment trial.
Carolyn Y. Johnson breaks down the single-shot coronavirus vaccine from Johnson & Johnson.
Christopher Ingraham?s kids loved dissecting owl pellets. The reporter took note and found out more about the owl pellet economy.
2021-02-01
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The Man in the Middle

How a moderate West Virginia Democrat could decide what Biden can do on climate change. Plus, the story of a snowstorm, six expiring vaccines and a group of dedicated health-care workers. 
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One coal state senator holds the key to Biden?s ambitious climate agenda ? and it?s not Mitch McConnell. Climate and science writer Sarah Kaplan reports.
When Oregon health-care workers got stuck in a snowstorm with expiring vaccines, they got creative. Andrea Salcedo reports. 
If you value the journalism you hear in this podcast, please subscribe to The Washington Post! We have a deal just for podcast listeners: two years of unlimited access to everything the Post publishes for just $59 total. That comes out to around $2.46 per month. To sign up, go to washingtonpost.com/subscribe
2021-01-29
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Gaming Wall Street

How ordinary investors, spurred on by a Reddit message board, took on the big Wall Street funds and sent GameStop share prices soaring. Plus, how President Biden is using the pandemic to try to expand access to health coverage.  Read more:
Business reporter Hamza Shaban explains what you need to know about GameStop?s stock price chaos. 
On Thursday, President Biden signed two executive actions, one of which was designed to expand access to health insurance through the Affordable Care Act and Medicaid. Health-care policy reporter Amy Goldstein on how the action is a direct response to the pandemic
If you value the journalism you hear in this podcast, please subscribe to The Washington Post! We have a deal just for podcast listeners ? two years of unlimited access to everything The Post publishes for just $59 total. That comes out to about $2.46 per month. To sign up, go to washingtonpost.com/subscribe
2021-01-28
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All the (former) president?s men

Why President Biden may not be able to fire some federal employees appointed during the Trump administration. The first Latino senator from California. And, what the new federal mask mandate means for you. 
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Lisa Rein reports that while Biden is firing some top Trump holdovers, in some cases, his hands may be tied.
California Gov. Newsom selects Alex Padilla to replace Kamala Harris in the Senate.
How do Biden?s new mask orders work? Health reporter William Wan explains. 
If you value the journalism you hear in this podcast, please subscribe to The Washington Post! We have a deal just for podcast listeners ? two years of unlimited access to everything The Post publishes for just $59 total. That comes out to about $2.46 per month. To sign up, go to washingtonpost.com/subscribe
2021-01-27
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The battle over reopening schools

The growing tensions between school systems and teachers unions. Plus, Biden's Cabinet may be ?the most diverse in history,? but his pick for agriculture secretary has reignited criticism over the USDA?s treatment of Black farmers.
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Chicago teachers are deadlocked with the school district over their reopening plans, but Chicago is far from alone. Education reporter Perry Stein explains the growing tensions between teachers unions and school systems
On Tuesday, CDC researchers published a data review in the Journal of the American Medical Association finding that there has been little spread of coronavirus in schools when precautions such as masks and social distancing are in place.
Producer Jordan-Marie Smith talked to reporter Laura Reiley about why Tom Vilsack?s nomination as agriculture secretary reopened old wounds for Black farmers.
If you value the journalism you hear in this podcast, please subscribe to The Washington Post! We have a deal just for podcast listeners ?- two years of unlimited access to everything The Post publishes for just $59 total. That comes out to about $2.46 per month. To sign up, go to washingtonpost.com/subscribe
2021-01-26
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Whose Senate is it anyway?

A standoff in the Senate. How essential workers are faring almost a year into the coronavirus pandemic. And, why vaccine rollout has been so slow in France.
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When President Biden took office last week, he promised sweeping, bipartisan legislation to solve the pandemic, fix the economy and overhaul immigration. Just days later, the Senate ground to a halt, its members unable to agree on rules for how the evenly divided body should operate. Reporter Mike DeBonis unpacks the standstill
At the start of the pandemic, grocery workers were lauded by their companies and customers for their essential work. Some leveraged that support into hazard pay. Some successfully pushed for mask enforcement in their stores. Almost a year later, they?re still on the front lines every day ? but appreciation for their sacrifice has waned. Photographer May-Ying Lam reports on the plight of these essential workers
France has had a particularly slow vaccine rollout, especially compared with its European neighbors like Germany. Foreign affairs reporter Rick Noack explains the delays facing one of the world?s most vaccine-skeptical countries
If you value the journalism you hear in this podcast, please subscribe to The Washington Post! We have a deal just for podcast listeners ? two years of unlimited access to everything The Post publishes for just $59 total. That comes out to around $2.46 per month. To sign up, go to washingtonpost.com/subscribe
2021-01-25
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400,000 people are dead. Can Biden change course?

How President Biden plans to combat the pandemic in his first 100 days. Where the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention went wrong with testing, and what it cost us. And what the U.K. coronavirus variant means for you.
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Just ahead of President Biden?s inauguration, the United States reached a grim milestone ? 400,000 people have died of the coronavirus, a quarter of them in the past month. Health policy reporter Amy Goldstein lays out the new administration?s plan for wrangling in the pandemic.
The CDC?s response to what has become the nation?s deadliest pandemic marked a low point in its 74-year history. Investigative reporter David Willman explains why the agency squandered valuable time designing its own test when others were available earlier on. 
The highly contagious variant of the coronavirus first seen in Britain may become the dominant strain in the United States, per the CDC. Science writer Joel Achenbach reports.
If you value the journalism you hear in this podcast, please subscribe to The Washington Post! We have a deal just for podcast listeners: two years of unlimited access to everything The Post publishes for just $59 total. That comes out to around $2.46 per month. To sign up, go to washingtonpost.com/subscribe
2021-01-22
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All-American terrorism

A wake-up call for federal law enforcement on domestic terrorism. How journalists who cover the White House are recalibrating post-Trump. And dogs return to the White House.
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National security reporter Shane Harris explains the soul-searching happening in federal law enforcement after Jan. 6, and how domestic terrorism might be handled in the United States. 
A conversation with Allison Michaels, host of the Post politics podcast ?Can He Do That?? on the show?s pivot to the new administration.
Style reporter Maura Judkis reports on the return of Big Dog Energy to the White House. 
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2021-01-21
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The 46th president

An inauguration like no other. And how the White House residence staff say goodbye to one first family and hello to another. 
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Joe Biden has been inaugurated as the 46th president of the United States, calling for unity in a speech to a divided nation. White House reporter Sean Sullivan reports. 
Kamala D. Harris is the first woman, and the first woman of color, to become vice president. Producer Jordan-Marie Smith talks to Harris's Alpha Kappa Alpha sorority sisters about how they?re celebrating.
Moving presidents? families into and out of the White House is a complicated process, expertly coordinated by the chief usher of the residence. Graphics reporter Bonnie Berkowitz describes the delicate dance, usually completed in under five hours. 
Subscribe to The Washington Post with an exclusive offer just for podcast listeners. Pay just $59 total for two years of unlimited access: washingtonpost.com/subscribe
2021-01-20
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Biden?s first days

Why the nation?s capital feels like a ghost town. What President-elect Joe Biden wants to get done on his first day in office. And why the Secret Service has been paying $3,000 a month for a bathroom. 
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President-elect Joe Biden has long been eager to undo and reshape policies advanced by the Trump administration over the past four years. Come Wednesday, he?ll make liberal use of his executive powers to do it, Matt Viser reports.
Peter Jamison was reporting on Ivanka Trump and Jared Kushner?s potential departure from D.C., and he discovered a bizarre detail: The federal government used $3,000 a month of taxpayer dollars to pay for a bathroom for their Secret Service detail to use. The Trump-Kushner family has half a dozen bathrooms in their household, but according to neighbors and law enforcement officials, the people charged with keeping the family safe were instructed not to use any of them.
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2021-01-19
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Tulsa, 100 years later

The plight of black entrepreneurs in Tulsa, nearly a century after one of the nation?s worst acts of racial violence. 
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In 1921, a White mob descended on the Greenwood district of Tulsa, killing scores of African Americans, and looting and burning their businesses to the ground. The Tulsa massacre decimated Greenwood, a commercial hub once hailed as the height of Black enterprise. 
But as Tracy Jan reports, Black erasure in Tulsa is hardly a remnant of the past. Today, Black entrepreneurs in historic Greenwood feel threatened yet again, as gentrification drives up property values and Black business owners get priced out of land ownership ? and some of them are asking why there still hasn?t been restitution for the past. 
In case you missed it: On Friday?s episode of Post Reports, we went in deep on the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol. With firsthand accounts from Post journalists, members of Congress and police, we reconstructed the events of that day, and answered some big questions about how it happened, why it happened and what might happen in the future. If you haven?t heard it yet, definitely go back to take a listen. That episode from Friday is called ?Four hours of insurrection.?
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2021-01-18
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Four hours of insurrection

Today, we reconstruct the riot inside the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6 ? hearing from the lawmakers, journalists and law enforcement officials who were there, and answering lingering questions about how things went so wrong. 
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The four-hour insurrection: How a mob of Trump supporters tried to disrupt American democracy. 
Reporters Rebecca Tan, Marissa J. Lang, Rhonda Colvin, and photojournalist Bill O?Leary were all witnesses to the violence on Jan. 6. They share their harrowing accounts of what it was like, inside and outside of the Capitol.
Reporter Peter Hermann explains how battered D.C. police made a stand against the Capitol mob. 
And reporter Carol D. Leonnig chronicles the experience of outgoing Capitol Police Chief Steven Sund, who told her that House and Senate security officials hamstrung his efforts to call in the National Guard.
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2021-01-16
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A brief history of tear gas in America

Tear gas is a chemical weapon banned in war. So why do police departments still use it on civilians in the United States? Producer Linah Mohammad and reporter Devlin Barrett examine the history of tear gas and the ethical questions about its use.
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Over the summer, tear gas was deployed to disperse peaceful protesters outside of St. John?s Church near the White House before President Trump posed with a Bible in front of the church, raising questions about the use of the chemical agent by law enforcement. 
Listen to the audio documentary KUOW at 65: The Battle in Seattle here.
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2021-01-15
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Impeached, again

President Trump is impeached by the House ? again. And, inside a California hospital overwhelmed by the pandemic.  Read more:
On Wednesday, the House of Representatives voted to impeach President Trump for the second time, on the charge of incitement of insurrection. This time, some Republicans supported the move, like Rep. Liz Cheney (R-Wyo.). Reporter Mike DeBonis reports on what it was like to be there today.
And while we?ve all been transfixed by the attack on the Capitol and its fallout ? there's still a pandemic happening. On Tuesday, more than 4,200 Americans died of covid-19. Jon Gerberg is a video journalist for The Post. He got rare access to a hospital in California where a covid-19 surge has completely overwhelmed the health-care system. He talked about it with producer Linah Mohammad. 
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2021-01-13
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Who?s in charge of the GOP?

A widening rift in the Republican Party. What FBI officials knew about the siege of the Capitol, and when they knew it. And, why the February Vogue cover of Kamala Harris is causing a stir.
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Political reporter Michael Scherer explains how the Capitol riot is escalating a fight for the soul of the Republican Party, with pro-Trump conspiracy theorists on one side and the party establishment on the other. 
The Washington Post has learned that a day before rioters stormed Congress, an FBI report warned of ?war? at the Capitol. That information contradicts a senior official?s declaration that the bureau had no intelligence indicating anyone at last week?s rally planned to do harm. National security reporter Matt Zapotosky lays out what we know about why law enforcement didn?t do more with the information. 
The nation?s first female vice president-elect has been photographed for the cover of February?s Vogue magazine, and a vocal chorus on social media is displeased with the images. The Post?s senior critic-at-large, Robin Givhan, explains why. 
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2021-01-12
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The insurrection planned in plain sight

How tech companies are responding to the far-right extremism on their platforms. Why we should have seen the siege on the Capitol coming. And, a brief history of presidential pettiness.
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The planning for last week?s assault on the U.S. Capitol happened largely in plain view, with chatters in far-right forums explicitly discussing how to storm the building, handcuff lawmakers with zip ties, and disrupt the certification of Joe Biden?s election. Those planners, however, are starting to lose their platforms, says reporter Drew Harwell. 
The scale of the siege was foreshadowed heavily on far-right social media websites, says researcher RazzanNakhlawi. And the groups who organized it ? they?ve been around for years, and they?re not going anywhere
President Trump says he will not attend President-elect Joe Biden?s inauguration. Writer Ronald G. Shafer explains that while this is uncommon in recent history, he?s not the first president to do so.
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2021-01-11
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Trump?s ?American Carnage?

Trump?s promise for a smooth transition of power might be too late, amid growing calls to remove him from office. After the attack on the Capitol, lawmakers seemed to come together ? but will that last with a 50-50 Senate? And an update from Georgia.
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White House bureau chief Phil Rucker brings us behind the scenes of a week when President Trump incited a mob of his supporters to attack the Capitol, and then, grudgingly, admitted his loss. 
With Democratic victories in Georgia?s runoff elections, the Senate will be equally split, with Vice President-Elect Kamala Harris serving as a tie-breaking vote. David Fahrenthold breaks down what that could look like
Last month, our host Martine Powers and producer Ted Muldoon reported from Georgia on the runoff elections, and all the people on the ground who were working to deliver a victory to the Democrats ? and the first Black senator from the state. One of those people was Bob Melvin, who we learned after the canvassing trip had contracted the coronavirus. We checked in with him this week after the Democrats? victory.
Correction: A previous version of this episode mistakenly said that Trump would be the second president to skip his successor?s Inauguration. In fact, there have been at least three others ? John Adams, John Quincy Adams, and Andrew Johnson.
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2021-01-08
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What happens after an insurrection?

The public fracturing of the Republican Party. Security failures at the Capitol. And, questions about why predominantly White rioters got kid-glove treatment from police.
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Lawmakers, rattled and angry, reconvened to certify election results after an angry pro-Trump mob stormed the U.S. Capitol. Seung Min Kim reports on the very public schism laid bare in the Republican Party. 
National security reporter Shane Harris on the massive failure of law enforcement to protect the building. 
Michael Brice-Saddler on the stark contrast between policing of predominantly White rioters at the Capitol and the Black Lives Matter protesters demonstrating last year. The comparison reveals a case of privilege, Brice-Saddler says. 
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2021-01-07
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Two Americas collide

The U.S. Capitol has been breached by a pro-Trump mob during the process of confirming Joe Biden?s vistory in the presidential election. Meanwhile, another election in Georgia is wrapping up ? with control of the Senate hanging in the balance. 
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A violent mob has breached the U.S. Capitol, halting a congressional count of electoral votes. Follow live updates here. 
Results from the Senate runoffs in Georgia signal a Democratic flip in the state, and in the Senate. National reporter Cleve Wootson reports from Atlanta
Eugene Scott, a reporter for The Fix, breaks down what we know about who voted in the Georgia runoffs, and how. 
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2021-01-07
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Can America?s vaccine rollout be fixed?

Why the vaccine rollout has been slower than expected in the United States. And, the political theater of counting electoral college votes. 
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Reporters Isaac Stanley-Becker and Brittany Shammas explain why state and local health systems are struggling to roll out coronavirus vaccines, and what that means for people hoping to sign up.
On Wednesday, Joe Biden will be one step closer to the presidency. Rosalind S. Helderman reports on what to expect during the congressional counting of electoral votes, and the futility of Republican lawmakers' objections
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2021-01-05
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?I just want to find 11,780 votes?

What President Trump?s pressure campaign to overturn his election defeat sounds like. And, a nursing home?s creative solution to physical isolation.
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Amy Gardner explains why Trump?s latest phone call to Georgia officials has legal scholars crying foul.
And as the nation keeps a close eye on Georgia?s two U.S. Senate runoff elections, it?s a good time to revisit Post Reports? deep dive into the real ? and perceived ? voter suppression in the state. 
And, after months of isolation, a ?hug room? in Italy lets nursing home residents touch their families for the first time, reports Chico Harlan.
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2021-01-04
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Georgia on our minds

As the dust settled after the November election, it became clear that the balance of power in Washington would all hinge on two Senate runoffs in Georgia. Whether President-elect Joe Biden will be able to accomplish major parts of his agenda, whether Congress will remain gridlocked, whether there will be single party rule or a still divided government -- it all comes down to Georgia. 
Attention, money and volunteers have poured into the state. But how much do we really understand about Georgia?s politics or history? Our host Martine Powers and producer Ted Muldoon bring us today?s dispatch from Georgia about these two runoff races, the history that led up to them and the ways that real and perceived voter suppression have collided in this one remarkable political moment.
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The Post?s political reporter Cleve Wootson has been reporting on the runoffs from Georgia for more than a month -- including looking at the massive amount of money and attention on the races. Records show Jon Ossoff and Raphael Warnock each raised more than $100 million in two months.
President Trump has been blasting Georgia?s election system. Many Republicans plan to vote in the Senate runoffs anyway.
In Georgia Senate runoffs, the focus ? and the fire ? is on Raphael Warnock.
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2020-12-30
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Love, actually ? isn?t all around

A story of love and family ? and deadlines. 
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For Post Reports producer Linah Mohammad, moving back in with her parents to weather the pandemic in Texas seemed like a harmless idea. 
But then Mohammad, who is single, turned 25 ? a milestone sometimes deemed ?the cutoff age for eligibility? for Arab women to marry ? and suddenly her parents? involvement in her love life made things a lot more complicated.
So she decided to do something she?d never done before: let her parents arrange a date.
Mohammad?s piece originally aired on the ?This American Life? episode ?Twenty-five.? 
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2020-12-29
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Underwater during a pandemic

In April, a massive dam failure in Midland, Mich., left an entire community underwater amid the pandemic. Jacob May saw the flood ravage his hometown and recorded an audio diary. This is Jacob?s story, and an update on how he?s doing now.
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Back in the spring, the producers of the Post podcast ?All Told? put together a series of audio diaries, bringing listeners inside different people?s experiences of the pandemic. One of those diaries was from Jacob May. In late April, a dam in Midland, Mich., failed massively. It left an entire community literally underwater. At the time, Jacob was a high school senior. He saw the devastation ravage his hometown. Today, we?re re-airing Jacob?s audio diary, and a follow-up interview to see how he?s doing now.
Previous audio diary episodes.
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2020-12-28
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?Presidential?: The story of Joe Biden

We really thought we knew everything there is to know about Joe Biden. ? But then we heard this episode of ?Presidential? with Lillian Cunningham and the New Yorker?s Evan Osnos, and we learned so much that we wanted to share it with you here. 
We?re taking a couple days off for Christmas. We hope you are safe and cozy wherever you are, whether you celebrate or not. We?ll be back on Monday, Dec. 28, with more stories from The Washington Post.
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Find the ?Presidential? podcast here, or wherever you get your podcasts. 
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2020-12-23
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London on lockdown

A new mutation of the coronavirus is spreading in the U.K. ? and causing chaos at certain ports of entry as Britain prepares to leave the European Union. Plus, the historic nomination of Rep. Deb Haaland to be interior secretary.
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The U.K. coronavirus mutation prompts more travel bans and major freight disruptions. The timing couldn?t be worse, London bureau chief Bill Booth says, as Britain prepares to leave the European Union. 
President-elect Joe Biden has picked Rep. Deb Haaland of New Mexico as his nominee for interior secretary. If confirmed, she?ll be the first Native American to serve in the position, managing the department that oversees the country?s tribal lands and has historically slighted Indigenous peoples in the United States. Subscribe to The Washington Post: https://postreports.com/offer
2020-12-22
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