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The Daily

The Daily

This is what the news should sound like. The biggest stories of our time, told by the best journalists in the world. Hosted by Michael Barbaro. Twenty minutes a day, five days a week, ready by 6 a.m.

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Biden?s Dilemmas, Part 1: Punishing Saudi Arabia

Joe Biden has had harsh words for the Saudis and the kingdom?s de facto leader, Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman.

It appeared that the period of appeasement toward the Saudis in the Trump administration was over. But the Biden administration?s inaction over a report that implicated the crown prince in the 2018 killing of the dissident and journalist Jamal Khashoggi has disappointed many of his allies.

Today, the first of a two-part look at what we?re learning about the Biden administration. First, a look at its approach to Saudi Arabia. 

Guest: David E. Sanger, a White House and national security correspondent for The Times. 

Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter

Background reading: 

For President Biden, deliberation and caution has thus far been his approach on the world stage.The president has decided not to penalize the Saudi crown prince over the killing of Jamal Khashoggi, fearing a breach in relations. This decision will disappoint many in the human rights community and in his own party. 

For more information on today?s episode, visit 

nytimes.com/thedaily.

 Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

2021-03-05
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How Close Is the Pandemic?s End?

It?s been almost a year since the World Health Organization declared the coronavirus outbreak a pandemic.

And the virus is persisting: A downward trend in the U.S. caseload has stalled, and concern about the impact of variants is growing. Yet inoculations are on the rise, and the F.D.A. has approved Johnson & Johnson?s single-dose vaccine, the third to be approved in the U.S.

Today, we check in on the latest about the coronavirus.

 

Guest: Carl Zimmer, a science writer and author of the ?Matter? column for The New York Times. 

   

Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter

Background reading: 

After the Johnson & Johnson vaccine approval, President Biden vowed that there would be enough vaccine doses for ?every adult in America? by the end of May.For more information about the emerging mutations, check out The Times?s variant tracker. 

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

 Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

2021-03-04
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Can Bill Gates Vaccinate the World?

When the coronavirus pandemic hit, the Microsoft founder Bill Gates was the most powerful and provocative private individual operating within global public health.

Today, we look at the role he has played in public health and his latest mission: procuring Covid-19 vaccines for countries in the developing world.

Guest: Megan Twohey, an investigative reporter for The New York Times; and Nicholas Kulish, an enterprise correspondent covering philanthropy, wealth and nonprofits for The Times.

Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter

Background reading: 

Bill Gates is working with the World Health Organization, drugmakers and nonprofits to tackle the coronavirus, including in the world?s poorest nations. Can they do it?An operation to supply billions of vaccine doses to poorer countries got underway last week. But as rich countries buy most of the available supply, stark inequalities remain.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

2021-03-03
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The $1.9 Trillion Stimulus Plan

The Senate is preparing to vote on another stimulus bill ? the third of the pandemic.

The bill has the hallmarks of a classic stimulus package: money to help individual Americans, and aid to local and state governments. It also contains provisions that would usher in long-term structural changes that have been pushed for many years by Democrats.

Today, we explore the contours of the Biden administration?s stimulus bill and look at the competing arguments. 

Guest: Jim Tankersley, a White House correspondent for The New York Times.  

Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter

Background reading: 

The stimulus bill is polling strongly across the country, including with many Republican voters, despite a scattershot series of attacks from congressional Republicans.Before the vote on President Biden?s stimulus package, here?s a fact check on some of the common talking points. 

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

 Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

2021-03-02
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Texas After the Storm

Even as the cold has lifted and the ice has melted in Texas, the true depth of the devastation left by the state?s winter storm can be difficult to see.

Today, we look at the aftermath through the eyes of Iris Cantu, Suzanne Mitchell and Tumaini Criss ? three women who, after the destruction of their homes, are reckoning with how they are going to move forward with their lives.

Guest: Jack Healy, a Colorado-based national correspondent for The New York Times. 

Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter

Background reading: 

Even with power back on across most of the state and warmer weather forecast, millions of Texans whose health and finances were already battered by a year of Covid-19 now face a grinding recovery from the storm.Here?s an analysis of how Texas?s drive for energy independence set it up for disaster.As the freak winter storm raged, historically marginalized communities were among the first to face power outages.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

2021-03-01
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The Sunday Read: ?Sigrid Johnson Was Black. A DNA Test Said She Wasn?t?

It all started when Sigrid E. Johnson was 62. She got a call from an old friend, asking her to participate in a study about DNA ancestry tests and ethnic identity. She agreed.

Ms. Johnson thought she knew what the outcome would be. When she was 16, her mother told her that she had been adopted as an infant. Her biological mother was an Italian woman from South Philadelphia, and her father was a Black man.

The results, however, told a different story.

Today on The Sunday Read, what the growth in DNA testing, with its surprises and imperfections, means for people?s sense of identity.

This story was written by Ruth Padawer and recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publishers like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

2021-02-28
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Odessa, Part 1: The School Year Begins

Odessa is a four-part audio documentary series about one West Texas high school reopening during the pandemic ? and the teachers, students and nurses affected in the process.

For the past six months, The New York Times has documented students? return to class at Odessa High School from afar through Google hangouts, audio diaries, phone calls and FaceTime tours. And as the country continues to debate how best to reopen schools, Odessa is the story of what happened in a school district that was among those that went first.

2021-02-26
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Fate, Domestic Terrorism and the Nomination of Merrick Garland

Five years ago, Judge Merrick B. Garland became a high-profile casualty of Washington?s political dysfunction. President Barack Obama selected him to fill the Supreme Court vacancy created by the death of Justice Antonin Scalia, but Senate Republicans blocked his nomination. In the process, Mr. Garland became known for the job he didn?t get.

Now, after being nominated by the Biden administration to become the next attorney general, Mr. Garland is finding professional qualifications under scrutiny once again. In light of the attack on the Capitol, we explore how his career leading investigations into domestic terrorism prepared him for his Senate confirmation hearing.

Guest: Mark Leibovich, the chief national correspondent for The New York Times Magazine, who spoke with Judge Merrick B. Garland.

Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter

Background reading: 

In his confirmation hearing this week, Mr. Garland said the United States now faced ?a more dangerous period? from domestic extremists than at the time of the 1995 Oklahoma City bombing.Here?s why Mr. Garland described his experience leading the Justice Department?s investigation into the 1995 bombing as ?the most important thing I have ever done in my life.?

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

2021-02-25
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When Covid Hit Nursing Homes, Part 2: ?They?re Not Giving Us an Ending?

When the pandemic was bearing down on New York last March, Gov. Andrew Cuomo?s administration issued a directive that allowed Covid-19 patients to be discharged into nursing homes in a bid to free up hospital beds for the sickest patients. It was a decision that had the potential to cost thousands of lives.

Today, in the second part of our look at New York nursing homes, we explore the effects of the decisions made by the Cuomo administration and the crisis now facing his leadership. 

Guest: Amy Julia Harris, an investigative reporter on The New York Times?s Metro desk. 

Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter

Background reading: 

Trying to quell a growing outcry over the state?s handling of nursing homes during the pandemic, Gov. Andrew Cuomo launched into a 90-minute defense of his actions while hitting back at critics.The scrutiny of Covid-19 deaths in New York nursing homes has also put Mr. Cuomo?s aggressive behavior in the spotlight.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

2021-02-24
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When Covid Hit Nursing Homes, Part 1: ?My Mother Died Alone?

When New York was the epicenter of the pandemic in the United States, Gov. Andrew Cuomo emerged as a singular, strong leader. Now his leadership is embattled, particularly over the extent of deaths in nursing homes during the peak.

Today, in the first of two parts on what went wrong in New York's nursing homes, we look at the crisis through the eyes of a woman, Lorry Sullivan, who lost her mother in a New York nursing home.

Guest: Amy Julia Harris, an investigative reporter on The New York Times?s Metro desk. 

Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter

Background reading: 

Trying to quell a growing outcry over the state?s handling of nursing homes during the pandemic, Gov. Andrew Cuomo launched into a 90-minute defense of his actions while lashing out at critics.The scrutiny of Covid-19 deaths in New York nursing homes has also put Governor Cuomo?s aggressive behavior in the spotlight.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

2021-02-23
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The Legacy of Rush Limbaugh

The conservative talk radio host Rush Limbaugh died last week. He was 70.

For decades, he broadcast mistrust and grievance into the homes of millions. Mr. Limbaugh helped create an entire ecosystem of right-wing media and changed the course of American conservatism.

Today, we look back on Rush Limbaugh?s career and how he came to have an outsize influence on Republican politics.

Guest: Jim Rutenberg, a writer at large for The New York Times and The Times Magazine. 

Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter

Background reading: 

With a following of many millions and a a divisive, derisive style of mockery and grievance, Rush Limbaugh was a force in reshaping American conservatism. Read his obituary here.Weaponizing conspiracy theories and bigotry long before Donald Trump?s ascent, the radio giant helped usher in the political style that came to dominate the Republican Party.  

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

2021-02-22
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The Sunday Read: ?The Man Who Turned Credit Card Points Into an Empire?

In recent years, travel ? cheap travel, specifically ? has boomed. Like all booms it has its winners (including influencers and home-sharing platforms like Airbnb) and its losers (namely locals and the environment). Somewhere in that mix is The Points Guy, Brian Kelly, who runs a blog that helps visitors navigate the sprawling, knotty and complex world of travel and credit card rewards.

Today on The Sunday Read, a look at the life and business of Mr. Kelly, a man who goes on vacation for a living.

This story was written by Jamie Lauren Keiles and recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publishers like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

2021-02-21
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Kids and Covid

The end of summer 2021 has been earmarked as the time by which most American adults will be vaccinated. But still remaining is the often-overlooked question of vaccinations for children, who make up around a quarter of the U.S. population.

Without the immunization of children, herd immunity cannot be reached.

Today, we ask when America?s children will be vaccinated.

Guest: Apoorva Mandavilli, a science and global health reporter for The New York Times. 

For an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. You can read the latest edition here.

Background reading: 

Pfizer and Moderna have begun testing their vaccines on children 12 and older. The vaccine for kids is coming, but not for many months.New research has cast doubt on the idea that prior infections with garden-variety coronaviruses might shield some people, particularly children, from the pandemic.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

2021-02-19
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A Battle for the Soul of Rwanda

The story of how Paul Rusesabagina saved the lives of his hotel guests during the Rwandan genocide was immortalized in the 2004 film ?Hotel Rwanda.? Leveraging his celebrity, Mr. Rusesabagina openly criticized the Rwandan government, and is now imprisoned on terrorism charges.

Today, we look at what Mr. Rusesabagina?s story tells us about the past, present and future of Rwanda.

Guest: Declan Walsh, chief Africa correspondent for The New York Times; and Abdi Latif Dahir, East Africa correspondent for The Times.

For an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. You can read the latest edition here.

Background reading: 

Paul Rusesabagina was mysteriously taken back to Rwanda late last year and arrested. His supporters say he has no chance of getting a fair hearing.In a jailhouse interview with Abdi Latif Dahir, Mr. Rusesabagina said he was duped into an arrest. He believed he was being flown to Burundi to talk to church groups.
2021-02-18
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The Blackout in Texas

An intense winter storm has plunged Texas into darkness. The state?s electricity grid has failed in the face of the worst cold weather there in decades.

The Texas blackouts could be a glimpse into America?s future as a result of climate change. Today, we explore the reasons behind the power failures.

Guest: Clifford Krauss, a national energy business correspondent based in Houston for The New York Times; and Brad Plumer, a climate reporter for The Times. 

For an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. You can read the latest edition here.

Background reading: 

Systems are designed to handle spikes in demand, but the wild and unpredictable weather linked to global warming will very likely push grids beyond their limits.As a winter storm forced the Texas power grid to the brink of collapse, millions of people were submerged into darkness, bitter cold and a sense of indignation over being stuck in uncomfortable and even dangerous conditions.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

2021-02-17
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An Impeachment Manager on Trump?s Acquittal

There was a sense of fatalism going into former President Donald Trump?s second impeachment trial. Many felt that it would almost certainly end in acquittal.

Not the Democratic impeachment managers. ?You cannot go into a battle thinking you?re going to lose,? said Stacey Plaskett, the congressional representative from the U.S. Virgin Islands who was one of the managers.

Today, we sit down with Ms. Plaskett for a conversation with Ms. Plaskett about the impeachment and acquittal and what happens next.

Guest: Delegate Stacey Plaskett of the U.S. Virgin Islands, an impeachment manager in the second trial.

For an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. You can read the latest edition here.

Background reading: 

Who is Stacey Plaskett? She could not vote to impeach President Donald Trump, but she made a case against him in his Senate trial.As one of the few Black lawmakers to play a role in the impeachment proceedings, Ms. Plaskett plans to turn her newfound prominence into gains for her constituents.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

2021-02-16
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The Sunday Read: 'Who's Making All Those Scam Calls?'

The app Truecaller estimates that as many as 56 million Americans have fallen foul to scam calls, losing nearly $20 billion.

Enter L., an anonymous vigilante, referred to here by his middle initial, who seeks to expose and disrupt these scams, posting his work to a YouTube channel under the name ?Jim Browning.?

On today?s Sunday Read, Yudhijit Bhattacharjee follows L.?s work and travels to India to understand the people and the forces behind these scams.

This story was written by Yudhijit Bhattacharjee and recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publishers like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

 

2021-02-14
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France, Islam and ?Laïcité?

?Laïcité,? or secularism, the principle that separates religion from the state in France, has long provoked heated dispute in the country. It has intensified recently, when a teacher, Samuel Paty, was beheaded after showing his class caricatures of the Prophet Muhammad.

We look at the roots of secularism and ask whether it works in modern, multicultural France.

Guest: Constant Méheut, a reporter for The New York Times in France.

For an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. You can read the latest edition here.

Background reading: 

For generations, public schools assimilated immigrant children into French society by instilling the nation?s ideals. The beheading of a teacher raised doubts about whether that model still worked.

For more information on today?s episode, visit 

nytimes.com/thedaily.

 Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.

2021-02-12
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A Broken System for Housing the Homeless

This episode contains descriptions of sexual violence. 

Victor Rivera has framed his life story as one of redemption and salvation. Escaping homelessness and drug addiction, he founded the Bronx Parent Housing Network, one of the largest nonprofits operating homeless shelters in New York City.

But that?s not the whole story. A Times investigation has found a pattern of allegations of sexual abuse and financial misconduct against him during his career.

We look at the accusations against Mr. Rivera and ask what lessons can be learned.

Guest: Amy Julia Harris, an investigative reporter on The New York Times?s Metro desk. 

For an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. You can read the latest edition here.

Background reading: 

Victor Rivera gained power and profit as New York?s homeless crisis worsened.After the Times investigation, Mr. Rivera was fired and now faces a criminal inquiry.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

2021-02-11
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What Will It Take to Reopen Schools?

Almost a year into the pandemic and the American education system remains severely disrupted. About half of children across the United States are not in school.

The Biden administration has set a clear goal for restarting in-person instruction: reopening K-8 schools within 100 days of his inauguration.

Is that ambitious target possible?

Guest: Dana Goldstein, a national education correspondent for The New York Times. 

For an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. You can read the latest edition here.

Background reading: 

A slow vaccine rollout and local fights between districts and unions could make it harder for President Biden to fulfill his promise to reopen schools quickly.In cities and suburbs where schools are closed, teachers? unions are often saying: not yet. One powerful union leader is trying to change that.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

2021-02-10
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A Guide to the (Latest) Impeachment Trial

The second impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump will begin today.

This time, the case against Mr. Trump is more straightforward: Did his words incite chaos at the Capitol on Jan. 6?

We look ahead to the arguments both sides will present.

Guest: Jim Rutenberg, a writer at large for The New York Times and The Times Magazine.

For an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. You can read the latest edition here.

Background reading: 

The impeachment case claims that former President Donald Trump was ?singularly responsible? for the Capitol riot. His defense team argues that he cannot be tried.Here?s what to watch for as the trial begins.Hours after the 2020 vote, Mr. Trump declared the process a fraud. We look at his 77-day campaign to subvert the election.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

2021-02-09
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Liz Cheney vs. Marjorie Taylor Greene

The departure of President Donald Trump and the storming of the Capitol have reignited a long-dormant battle over the future of the Republican Party.

Today, we look at two lawmakers in the Republican House conference whose fate may reveal something about that future: Liz Cheney of Wyoming, who voted in favor of Mr. Trump?s second impeachment, and Marjorie Taylor Greene of Georgia, a proponent of conspiracy theories.

Guest: Alexander Burns, a national political correspondent for The New York Times. 

For an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. You can read the latest edition here.

Background reading: 

The Republican leadership would like to blunt President Donald Trump?s influence over the party. Mr. Trump and his allies want to punish those who have crossed him. A series of clashes loom.In back-to-back votes, the Republican conference voted to keep Liz Cheney in a leadership position and the House moved to eject Marjorie Taylor Greene from its committees. 

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

2021-02-08
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The Sunday Read: 'The Many Lives of Steven Yeun'

Jay Caspian Kang, the author and narrator of this week?s Sunday Read, spoke with the actor Steven Yeun over Zoom at the end of last year. The premise of their conversations was Mr. Yeun?s latest starring role, in ?Minari? ? a film about a Korean immigrant family that takes up farming in the rural South.

They discussed the usual things: Mr. Yeun?s childhood, his parents and acting career ? which includes a seven-year stint on the hugely popular television series ?The Walking Dead.? But the topic of conversation kept circling back to something much deeper.

Today on The Sunday Read, Jay?s profile and meditation on Asian-American identity.

This story was written by Jay Caspian Kang. To hear more audio stories from publishers like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

2021-02-07
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The $2.7 Billion Case Against Fox News

?The Earth is round. Two plus two equals four. Joe Biden and Kamala Harris won the 2020 election for president and vice president of the United States.? So begins the 280-page complaint filed by Smartmatic, an election software company, against the Fox Corporation.

Smartmatic accuses the network of doing irreparable damage to the company?s business by allowing election conspiracy theorists to use Fox News as a megaphone for misinformation.

Today, we hear from Antonio Mugica, Smartmatic?s C.E.O., and the lawyer Erik Connelly about the $2.7 billion case.

Guest: Ben Smith, the media columnist for The New York Times. 

For an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. You can read the latest edition here.

Background reading: 

In the latest volley in the dispute over disinformation in the presidential election, Rupert Murdoch?s Fox Corporation has been sued by Smartmatic, which accuses his cable networks of defamation and contributing to the fervor that led to the siege of the Capitol.In December, Ben Smith spoke with Mr. Mugica and Mr. Connelly about the claims being made against Smartmatic. Read the interview here.  

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

2021-02-05
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The End of Democracy in Myanmar

Rumors had been swirling for days before Myanmar?s military launched a coup, taking back power and ousting the civilian leader, Daw Aung San Suu Kyi.

Myanmar?s experiment with democracy, however flawed, now appears to be over.

Today, we examine the rise and fall of Aung San Suu Kyi.

Guest: Hannah Beech, The New York Times?s Southeast Asia bureau chief. 

For an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. You can read the latest edition here.

Background reading: 

The coup returns Myanmar to full military rule after a short span of quasi-democracy. Here is what we know.Myanmar seemed to be building a peaceful transition to civilian governance. Instead, a personal struggle between military and civilian leaders brought it all down.Aung San Suu Kyi, once considered a shimmering icon of democracy, has lost her halo.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

2021-02-04
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?Please, Give Me Back My Daughter?

When her daughter Karen was kidnapped in 2014, Miriam Rodríguez knew the Zetas, a cartel that ran organized crime in her town of San Fernando, Mexico, were responsible.

From the hopelessness that her daughter may never return came resolve: She vowed to find all those responsible and bring them to justice.

One by one, Ms. Rodríguez tracked these people down through inventive, homespun detective methods.

Today, we share the story of her three-year campaign for justice.

Guest: Azam Ahmed, The New York Times?s bureau chief for Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean.

For an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. You can read the latest edition here.

Background reading: 

Armed with a handgun, a fake ID card and disguises, Miriam Rodríguez was a one-woman detective squad, defying a system where criminal impunity often prevails. Read Azam's full story (also available in Spanish here).

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

2021-02-03
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Assessing Biden?s Climate Plan

President Biden?s plans for curbing the most devastating impacts of a changing climate are ambitious.

His administration is not only planning a sharp U-turn from the previous White House ? former President Donald Trump openly mocked the science behind human-caused climate change ? but those aims go even further than the Obama administration?s.

Today, we look at the Biden administration?s environmental proposals, as well as the potential roadblocks and whether these changes can last.

Guest: Coral Davenport, an energy and environmental policy reporter for The New York Times. 

For an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. You can read the latest edition here.

Background reading: 

President Biden, emphasizing job creation, has signed an array of directives that elevate climate change across every level of the federal government. But huge hurdles, some from within his own party, lie ahead.On taking office, Mr. Biden brought with him the largest team of climate change experts ever assembled in the White House.The Biden administration?s ambitions could mean big changes in America?s trade, foreign relations and even defense strategy.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

2021-02-02
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The GameStop Rebellion

This episode contains strong language.

GameStop can feel like a retailer from a bygone era. But last week, it was dragged back into the zeitgeist when it became the center of an online war between members of an irreverent Reddit subforum and hedge funds ? one that left Wall Street billions of dollars out of pocket.

Today, we look at how and why the GameStop surge happened, as well as how it can be viewed as the story of our time.

Guests: Taylor Lorenz, a technology reporter covering internet culture for The New York Times; and Andrew Ross Sorkin, a financial columnist for The Times. 

For an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. You can read the latest edition here.

Background reading: 

GameStop shares have soared 1,700 percent as millions of small investors, egged on by social media, employ a classic Wall Street tactic to put the squeeze on Wall Street.A legion of young people ? primarily male ? have been pouring into digital trading floors for years, raised on social media and eager to teach themselves about stocks. These are the misfits shaking up Wall Street.It has been a weird time in the stock market, where a video game retailer has suddenly become the center of attention. Here are four things you need to know about the GameStop insanity. 

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

2021-02-01
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The Sunday Read: 'The Forgotten Sense'

?Smell is a startling superpower,? writes Brooke Jarvis, the author of today?s Sunday Read. ?If you weren?t used to it, it would seem like witchcraft.?

For hundreds of years, smell has been disregarded. Most adults in a 2019 survey ranked it as the least important sense; and in a 2011 survey of young people, the majority said that their sense of smell was less valuable to them than their technological devices.

The coronavirus has precipitated a global reckoning with the sense. Smell, as many have found in the last year, is no big deal until it?s missing.

This story was written by Brooke Jarvis and recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publishers like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

2021-01-31
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A Conspiracy Theory Is Proved Wrong

This episode contains strong language. 

Inauguration Day was supposed to bring vindication for adherents of the pro-Trump conspiracy theory QAnon.

Instead, they watched as Joe Biden took the oath as the 46th president of the United States.

What happens to a conspiracy theory and its followers when they are proved wrong?

Guest: Kevin Roose, a technology columnist for The New York Times. 

For an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. You can read the latest edition here.

Background reading: 

As Mr. Biden took office and Mr. Trump landed in Florida, with no mass arrests in sight, some QAnon believers struggled to harmonize the falsehoods with the inauguration on their TVs.Valerie Gilbert posts dozens of times a day in support of QAnon. Her story hints at how hard it will be to bring people like her back to reality.What is QAnon? Here is an explainer on the ?big tent conspiracy theory.?

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

2021-01-29
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The Fate of the Filibuster

As Democrats and Republicans haggled over how to share power in the Senate, Mitch McConnell, the minority leader, made one key demand: Do not touch the filibuster rule.

Today, we explore the mechanics and history of the rule and look ahead at its fate. 

Guest: Julie Hirschfeld Davis, the congressional editor for The New York Times. 

For an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. You can read the latest edition here.

Background reading: 

The debate over the minority?s ability to filibuster legislation has foreshadowed a fraught landscape ahead over what Democrats should do if Republicans obstruct President Biden?s agenda.Mr. Biden doesn?t want to eliminate the filibuster, which can be an impediment to major legislation. Left-leaning Democrats disagree, but they?re holding back for now.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

2021-01-28
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Why Are U.S. Coronavirus Cases Falling? And Will the Trend Last?

The number of new coronavirus cases in the United States is falling, but has the country turned a corner in the pandemic? And what kind of threats do the new variants pose to people and to the vaccine rollout?

Today, we discuss the latest in the quest to stamp out the pandemic.  

Guest: Donald G. McNeil Jr., a science and health reporter for The New York Times. 

For an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. You can read the latest edition here.

Background reading: 

New daily cases are starting to slow, in what some health experts see as a turning point. But they warn of a bumpy vaccination rollout amid the emergence of more contagious variants.The C.D.C. has eased coronavirus vaccine rules: The agency now says people can switch authorized vaccines between the first and second doses, and also extend the interval between doses to six weeks.One year, 400,000 coronavirus deaths: a look at how the U.S. set itself up for failure.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

2021-01-27
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?The Skunk at the Picnic?: Dr. Anthony Fauci on Working for Trump

This episode contains strong language.

In many instances while advising the Trump administration on the pandemic, Dr. Anthony Fauci was faced with a ?difficult? situation. Yet he said he had never considered quitting.

What was it like working under President Donald J. Trump? We listen in on a candid conversation between Dr. Fauci and Donald G. McNeil Jr., the Times science and health reporter.

Guest: Donald G. McNeil Jr., a science and health reporter for The New York Times. 

For an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. You can read the latest edition here.

Background reading: 

From denialism to death threats, Dr. Anthony S. Fauci described to Donald G. McNeil Jr. a fraught year as an adviser to President Donald J. Trump on the pandemic.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

2021-01-26
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Aleksei Navalny and the Future of Russia

The Russian activist Aleksei Navalny has spent years agitating against corruption, and against President Vladimir Putin. 

Last summer he was poisoned with a rare nerve agent linked to the Russian state. Last week, after recovering in Germany, he returned to Moscow. He was arrested at the airport, but he managed to put out a call for protest, which was answered in the streets of more than a hundred Russian cities.

Today, we look at the improbable story of Aleksei Navalny.

Guest: Anton Troianovski, who has been a Moscow correspondent for The New York Times since 2019. 

For an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. You can read the latest edition here.

Background reading: 

Pro-Navalny protests moved across time zones and more than 3,000 people were arrested in at least 109 cities, signaling widespread fatigue with the corruption-plagued political order presided over by President Vladimir Putin.The protests presented the Russian government with its biggest wave of dissent in years.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

2021-01-25
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The Sunday Read: ?The Amateur Cloud Society That (Sort Of) Rattled the Scientific Community?

The cultural history of clouds seemed to be shaped by amateurs ? the likes of Luke Howard and the Honorable Ralph Abercromby ? each of whom projected the ethos of his particular era onto those billowing blank slates in the troposphere. Gavin Pretor-Pinney was our era?s.

On today?s Sunday Read, the story of the Cloud Appreciation Society and how Mr. Pretor-Pinney, backed by good will, challenged the cloud authorities.

This story was written by Jon Mooallem and recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publishers like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

2021-01-24
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Biden?s Executive Orders

Within hours of assuming the presidency, President Biden signed a flurry of executive orders. He rejoined the Paris climate agreement, repealed the so-called Muslim travel ban and mandated the wearing of masks on federal property.

The actions had a theme: They either reversed former President Donald Trump?s actions or rebuked his general policy approach.

But governing by decree has a downside. We look at the potential positives of the orders and point out the pitfalls.

Guest: Michael D. Shear, a White House correspondent for The New York Times. 

For an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. You can read the latest edition here.

Background reading: 

Mr. Biden?s actions on Day 1 included orders on immigration, criminal justice and the climate.Here are the president?s 17 executive orders and other directives in detail.The U.S. has some catching up to do on the Paris climate agreement. Here?s an explainer on the history of the accord.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

2021-01-22
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The Inauguration of Joe Biden

Unity was the byword of President Biden?s Inaugural Address.

The speech was an attempt to turn the page. But can this be achieved without, as many in the Democratic coalition believe, a full reckoning with and accountability of how America got to this point of division?

Today, we explore the defining messages of the president?s inaugural address. 

Guests: Astead W. Herndon, a national political reporter for The New York Times; Emily Cochrane, a congressional reporter for The Times.  

For an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. You can read the latest edition here.

Background reading: 

President Biden spoke of a return to the ordinary discord of democracy, with a reminder that ?politics doesn?t have to be a raging fire, destroying everything in its path.? You can read the full annotated speech here.For many in an exhausted, divided nation, the inauguration was a sea change, not just a transition.At the made-for-TV swearing-in, rituals of normalcy ran into reminders that these are anything but normal times.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

2021-01-21
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?Restoring the First Brick of Dignity?: Biden Supporters on His Inauguration

Joe Biden will be sworn in as the 46th president of the United States today. Among Democrats, there is a sense of joy and hope, but also of caution and concern.

We speak with a range of Mr. Biden?s supporters, including activists who had originally hoped for a more progressive ticket and longtime fans who embrace his moderation.

Guests:

Jennifer Medina, a national politics reporter for The New York Times.

For an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. You can read the latest edition here.

Background reading: 

Urging unity, Mr. Biden has tried to focus on his policy plans. But many of those who elected him are still fixated on his predecessor.Mr. Biden?s long career in public office spanned eight presidents. Now, at 78, he will join their ranks.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

2021-01-20
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'What Kind of Message Is That?': How Republicans See the Attack on the Capitol

Polling in the days since the storming of the Capitol paints a complex picture. While most Americans do not support the riot, a majority of Republicans do not believe that President Trump bears responsibility. And over 70 percent of them say they believe that there was widespread fraud in the election.

Before President-elect Joe Biden?s inauguration, we called Trump supporters to hear their views about what happened at the Capitol and to gauge the level of dissatisfaction the new president will inherit.

Guest:

Jennifer Medina, a national politics reporter for The New York Times.

For an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. You can read the latest edition here.

Background reading: 

A Pennsylvania woman accused of taking Speaker Nancy Pelosi?s laptop during the attack on the Capitol turned herself in to the police.Mr. Trump has prepared a wave of pardons for his final hours in office. Among those under consideration: the former New York Assembly speaker Sheldon Silver and the rapper Lil Wayne.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

2021-01-19
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The Sunday Read: 'The Valve Turners'

Most Americans treat climate change seriously but not literally ? they accept the science, worry about forecasts but tell themselves that someone else will get serious about fixing the problem very soon.

The Valve Turners, on the other hand, take climate change both very seriously and very literally.

In the fall of 2016, the group of five environmental activists ? all in their 50s and 60s, most with children and one with grandchildren ? closed off five cross-border crude oil pipelines, including the Keystone.

On today?s Sunday Read, who are the Valve Turners and what are their motivations?

This story was written by Michelle Nijhuis and recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publishers like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

2021-01-17
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?Rankly Unfit?: The View From a Republican Who Voted to Impeach

This episode contains strong language. 

Three days after being sworn into Congress, Representative Peter Meijer, Republican of Michigan, was sitting in the gallery of the House of Representatives as pro-Trump rioters stormed the Capitol.

After the siege, Mr. Meijer made his feelings clear: President Trump?s actions proved that he was ?rankly unfit.? A week later, he became one of just a handful of Republicans to vote for impeachment.

We talk with Mr. Meijer about his decision, his party and his ambitions.

Guest: Representative Peter Meijer, a first-term Republican congressman from Michigan.

For an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. You can read the latest edition here.

Background reading: 

Meet the first-term Republican representatives who are emerging as some of their party?s sharpest critics.Many Republican leaders and strategists want to prepare the party for a post-Trump future. But the pro-Trump voter base has other ideas.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

2021-01-15
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Impeached, Again

?A clear and present danger.? Those were the words used by Nancy Pelosi to describe President Trump, and the main thrust of the Democrats? arguments for impeachment on the House floor.

While most House Republicans lined up against the move, this impeachment, unlike the last, saw a handful vote in favor.

Today, we walk through the events of Wednesday, and the shifting arguments that led up to the history-making second impeachment.

Guest: Maggie Haberman, a White House correspondent for The New York Times. 

For an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. You can read the latest edition here.

Background reading: 

President Trump has become the first president to be impeached twice, after the House approved a single chargea single charge of inciting the mob that stormed the Capitol. He faces a Senate trial that could disqualify him from future office.Senator Mitch McConnell is said to have privately backed the impeachment of Mr. Trump.The second impeachment ? in a Capitol ringed by troops ? seemed like the almost inevitable culmination of four years that left the nation fractured, angry and losing its sense of self.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

2021-01-14
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Is More Violence Coming?

After the attack on the Capitol, social media platforms sprang into action, deleting the accounts of agitators.

Without a central place to congregate, groups have splintered off into other, darker corners of the internet. That could complicate the efforts of law enforcement to track their plans.

We ask whether the crackdown on social media has reduced the risk of violence ? or just made it harder to prevent.

Guest: Sheera Frenkel, a cybersecurity reporter for The New York Times. 

For an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. You can read the latest edition here.

Background reading: 

In the days since rioters stormed Capitol Hill, fringe groups like armed militias, QAnon conspiracy theorists and far-right supporters of President Trump have vowed to continue their fight in hundreds of conversations on a range of internet platforms.Amazon, Apple and Google have cut off Parler, all but killing the service just as many conservatives were seeking alternatives to Facebook and Twitter.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

2021-01-13
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A Swift Impeachment Plan

At the heart of the move to impeach President Trump is a relatively simple accusation: that he incited a violent insurrection against the government of the United States.

We look at the efforts to punish the president for the attack on the Capitol and explain what the impeachment process might look like.

Guest: Nicholas Fandos, a national reporter for The New York Times.

For an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. You can read the latest edition here.

Background reading: 

Speaker Nancy Pelosi said the House would formally call on Vice President Mike Pence to invoke the 25th Amendment to strip President Trump of power and move to impeach the president if Mr. Pence refused.Here?s a closer look at what the president said at a rally of his supporters, which is a focus of the impeachment case.

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

2021-01-12
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A Pandemic Update: The Variant and the Vaccine Rollout

As 2020 drew to a close, a concerning development in the pandemic came out of Britain ? a new variant of the coronavirus had been discovered that is significantly more transmissible. It has since been discovered in a number of countries, including the United States.

The emergence of the new variant has added a new level of urgency to the rollout of vaccines in the U.S., a process that has been slow so far.

Today, an exploration of two key issues in the fight against the pandemic.

Guests: Carl Zimmer, a science writer and author of the ?Matter? column for The New York Times; Abby Goodnough, a national health care correspondent for The Times. 

For an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. You can read the latest edition here.

Background reading: 

The new variant of the coronavirus, discovered in December, appears to be more contagious than, and genetically distinct from, more established variants. Here is what we know about it.The first case of the variant in the U.S. was found in Colorado in December. Pfizer has said that its vaccine works against the key mutation.The distribution of the vaccine in the U.S. is taking longer than expected ? holiday staffing and saving doses for nursing homes are contributing to delays. 

For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

2021-01-11
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The Sunday Read: 'A Mother and Daughter at the End'

Without many predators or any prey, rhinos flourished for millions of years. Humans put an end to that, as we hunted them down and destroyed their habitat.

No rhino, however, is doing worse than the northern white. Just two, Najin and Fatu, both females, remain.

In his narrated story, Sam Anderson, a staff writer at The Times Magazine, visits the pair at the Ol Pejeta conservancy in Kenya, speaks to the men who devote their days to caring for them and explores what we will lose when Najin and Fatu die.

This story was written by Sam Anderson and recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publishers like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

2021-01-10
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How They Stormed Congress

This episode contains strong language.

The pro-Trump mob that stormed the Capitol on Wednesday made their plans in plain sight. They organized on social media platforms and spoke openly of their intentions to occupy the Capitol.

But leaders in Washington opted for a modest law enforcement presence. In the aftermath, those security preparations are attracting intense scrutiny.

Today, we explore how the events of Jan. 6 could have happened.


Guest: Sheera Frenkel, who covers cybersecurity for The New York Times; Zolan Kanno-Youngs, a homeland security correspondent for The Times.


For an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. You can read the latest edition here.


Background reading:

Inside Trump supporters? online echo chambers, the chaos of Jan. 6 could be seen coming.Failures by the police have spurred resignations and complaints of double standards.During the storming of the Capitol, social media sites were used by the mob to share information, including directions on which streets to take to avoid the police and which tools to bring to help pry open doors.


For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily

2021-01-08
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An Assault on the Capitol

This episode contains strong language.

It was always going to be a tense day in Washington. In the baseless campaign to challenge Joe Biden?s victory, Wednesday had been framed by President Trump and his allies as the moment for a final stand.

But what unfolded was disturbing: A mob, urged on by the president, advanced on the Capitol building as Congress was certifying the election results and eventually breached its walls.

Today, the story of what happened from Times journalists who were inside the Capitol.


Guests: Nicholas Fandos, a national reporter for The New York Times; Jonathan Martin, a national political correspondent for The Times; and Emily Cochrane, a congressional reporter for The Times.


For an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. You can read the latest edition here.


Background reading:

Journalists from The Times witnessed the violence and mayhem. Here?s how it unfolded.One of the most disturbing aspects of Wednesday?s events was that they could be seen coming. The president himself had all but circled the date.Here is an explanation of how the pro-Trump mob managed to storm the Capitol


For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily

2021-01-07
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A Historic Night in Georgia

The long fight for control of the U.S. Senate is drawing to a close in Georgia, and the Democrats appear set to win out ? the Rev. Raphael Warnock is the projected winner of his race against Senator Kelly Loeffler, while Jon Ossoff is heavily favored to beat the other incumbent Republican, Senator David Perdue.

Today, we look at the results so far from these history-making Senate races and at what they mean for the future and fortunes of the two main parties.


Guest: Nate Cohn, a domestic correspondent for The Upshot at The New York Times.


For an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. You can read the latest edition here.


Background reading:

A Baptist preacher born and raised in Georgia, Raphael Warnock has defeated Kelly Loeffler to become his state?s first Black senator, breaking a barrier with distinct meaning in American politics.A surge in turnout from Georgia?s Black voters has powered the fortunes of Mr. Warnock and Jon Ossoff.You can follow the results here.


For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily

2021-01-06
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The Georgia Runoffs, Part 2: ?I Have Zero Confidence in My Vote?

Since the presidential election was called for Joe Biden, President Trump has relentlessly attacked the integrity of the count in Georgia. He has floated conspiracy theories to explain away his loss and attacked Republican officials.

Today, we speak to Republican activists and voters on the ground and consider to what extent, if at all, Mr. Trump?s rhetoric could discourage Republicans from voting in the runoff elections.


For an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. You can read the latest edition here.


Background reading:

Senators Kelly Loeffler and David Perdue have sought to motivate a conservative base that remains loyal to Mr. Trump while also luring back some of the defectors who helped deliver Georgia to a Democratic presidential candidate for the first time since 1992.Democrats may have claimed a bigger share of the early vote than they did in November?s vote, election data shows. Here?s what else we know about the voting in Georgia so far.


For more information on today?s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily

2021-01-05
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